COURSES

Phys 8107

Holographic Imaging and Diffractive Optics:

This course describes the nature of holographic and lithographically formed diffraction volume/thin gratings and necessary tools for their design and analysis. Course topics include a description of the interference and Fourier relations that determine the amplitude of diffracted fields, analysis of volume gratings, and properties of holographic recording materials, binary gratings, and analysis of applications of holography including bio-imaging and data storage, fiber Bragg gratings, and polarization control elements. This class can complement the courses of Optics and Advanced Bio-Optical Microscopy. 

1

Basic concepts and introduction of terminology(1) Overview of applications of holography(2) Differences between holographic and lens imaging(3) Absorption and phase modulation(4) Thin and thick gratings(5) Transmission and reflection gratings

2

(1) Principles of holographic recording and reconstruction (2) Phase conjugation and time-reversed wave.

3

(1) Introduction of zone plate, (2) Review of holographic recording process, and (3) Principles of dispersion for thin gratings

4

Fourier analysis of gratings, including (1) review of Fresnel diffraction and Fraunhofer formulas, (2) diffraction patterns from apertures, and (3) Fourier analysis of absorption and phase gratings.

5

Lab #1: digital holographic imaging: recording process and computational reconstruction procedure.

6

(1) Fourier analysis of off-axis gratings, (2) difference between on-axis, and off-axis gratings, and (3) off-axis hologram reconstruction. 

7

Continue on off-axis holographic topics, and review home assignment

8

Image analysis of holograms includes: (1) exact ray tracing, (2) paraxial ray tracing, and (3) aberration of holographic lenses.

9

(1) Summary of Phys' 2nd lab, and (2) introduction of coherence: temporal/spatial coherence

10

Hologram recording requirements: Coherence, visibility, polarization, and beam ratio.

11

(1) Demo: holographic microscopic setup through VH filter made in our previous lab. (2) Introduction of VH.

12

Coupled wave theory for (1) transmission and reflection gratings, (2) lossless, lossy, and absorption gratings.

13

2nd lab

14

Final project review

15

Final Exam

 

Med 5036

Optical Microscopy and Its Applications:

Introduce the basic optical image system, including 3D image and high resolution. The purpose is to promote the concept of optical image systems and applications for medical students.

1

Basic concepts and introduction of terminology: (1) Overview of applications of optical microscopy, and (2) Differences among optical microscopic imaging and other clinical imaging techniques.

2

(1) Basic applications of confocal microscopy, (2) introduction of confocal imaging, (3) difference between confocal and conventional microscopy in tissue imaging (* reference paper: attached Nature review paper)

3

Optical Microscopy Lab (I): Home-made (lab-made) basic setup of a conventional microscopic system

4

(1) Overview of phase contrast microscopy, (2) comparison between phase contrast techniques and conventional microscopy of living cells, and (3) basic concept of related phase enhanced imaging

5

Optical Microscopy Lab (II): confocal microscopic system

6

Optical Microscopy Lab (III): lab-made basic setup of digital holographic microscopic (DHM) system

7

Midterm

8

Optical Microscopy Lab (IV): fluorescence staining process 

9

Optical Microscopy Lab (V): structured illumination microscopy (SIM) 

10

Optical Microscopy Lab (VI): structured illumination microscopy (SIM)

11

Final project presentation group (I)

12

Guest lecture: MIT Prof. George Barbastathis; Final project presentation group (II)